Use Leveled Books in Student Led Discussions

Passionate educator and popular author Laura Robb shares her ideas for moving teaching into the age of choice and collaboration!

By Laura Robb

It’s time to let go of 19th-century instructional methods that are alive and well in too many middle school classrooms around our country. Take a deep breath and think of the students sitting in classrooms you know about and consider how well the following practices serve them.

Practice: The entire class reads the same book.

Pitfalls: One book serves the group who can read it. Students who can’t read the book aren’t reading, and those who find it easy aren’t progressing because the book is at their independent reading level.

Practice: The teacher leads a recitation and asks questions that usually have one correct answer, then selects students to respond. Immediately, the teacher moves on to the next question.

Pitfalls: Asking students to answer literal questions doesn’t foster critical and analytical thinking. Moreover, students don’t have opportunities to pose and discuss their own questions.

Practice: Students complete worksheets with multiple choice and fill-in-the-blank questions.

Pitfalls: Fill-in-the-blanks and multiple choice questions are artificial checks to gauge literal comprehension; they are not authentic responses to reading. Research shows that when students write authentic responses about books they read, their comprehension rises by 24 percent.

Practice: Students sit in rows.

Pitfalls: A hallmark of 21st-century learning is collaboration. Sitting in rows isolates students and discourages generating ideas and discussing worthwhile texts in small groups.

Updating Teaching Practices

You can avoid the pitfalls associated with these traditional methods by implementing robust practices that differentiate instruction so that all students can improve their reading, writing, critical thinking, and collaboration skills.

It’s beneficial to work with a colleague so you can support one another and observe the changes in action when you visit each other’s classrooms. By differentiating reading instruction and inviting students to discuss diverse texts using student-led conversations, you can heighten their ability to analyze texts and hone their critical thinking skill. Let’s break it down.

Differentiating Reading

We need to shift our practice from students reading the same book to students reading books at their instructional reading level. This practice is quite manageable when you offer books at different reading levels that are connected by genre, theme, or topic, enabling students to talk and think together even though they are reading different books. Rather than “covering” a specific book, reading instruction becomes focused on the ideas you want students to understand.

For example, Ms. Galloway’s eighth grade class was reading Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird. Out of 27 students, 10 could read and comprehend the book. However, when I asked her what she wanted students to learn from that book, she said, “I want them to understand what it was like for African Americans before civil rights.”

Armed with her idea, Ms. Galloway and I found several books that met the instructional reading levels of her students and addressed her target concepts. Differentiation enabled every student to reflect on life in the South prior to civil rights legislation using a text he or she could read — and every student could contribute to a meaningful, collaborative discussion on the topic. Here’s our list with lexile levels:

And here are some tips for developing units with diverse texts that reach every reader in your class.

Tip 1: Identify the idea(s) you want students to explore as they read.

Tip 2: Ask your school and community librarians to find books related to these ideas on the reading levels of students in your class.

Tip 3: Organize stacks of books on the same reading level. Invite students to browse through the books at their instructional reading level and choose one to read.

Tip 4: Chunk books by having students read three to four chapters, then stop to hold a partner or small group student-led discussion on that section.

Student-Led Literary Conversations

A powerful form of thinking and communicating, student-led conversations can last from five to 15 minutes and bring social interactions to students’ learning. When students are in charge of discussing books they selected and can read, motivation and engagement soar. These conversations develop critical thinking and strong communication skills as students practice framing responses to peers that represent their ideas with clarity.

Have students take turns volunteering to be the group’s leader. The primary job of the leader is to maintain the forward motion of the discussion by using prompts such as:

  • Can you provide text evidence?
  • Does anyone have a different idea?
  • Can you elaborate further on that point?
  • How does that relate to what (another student) said?
  • Can you link that idea to a teacher’s read-aloud?

Open-Ended Ways to Discuss Diverse Books

Students can use literary elements, themes, ideas, and genre structure to discuss different books.

Explore Literary Elements. Have students identify the protagonist and several problems he or she faces; antagonists and how each works against the protagonist; conflicts, themes, and how other characters affect the protagonist.

Focus on Genre. Ask students to discuss genre structure. For example, for realistic fiction they can discuss what makes the characters and plot realistic. For science fiction they can reflect on the warnings about present-day society and/or technology that the author presents.

Think Through Themes. Have students provide examples of unit themes such as obstacles the person or character faces and whether he or she overcomes these. Or ask students to define stereotyping and offer theme statements that are examples of this from their books.

Assessing Discussions

You can observe one to two discussions during a 45-minute class period. Students can also write several key points from a discussion in their readers’ notebooks and/or evaluate the discussions by writing about specific examples raised during the discussion. Encourage self-reflection using these questions: Did I participate? Did I cite evidence? Did I listen carefully? What did I learn about my book? About a different book? About literary elements? About genre? About theme?

It’s helpful to have students compose open-ended, interpretive questions that apply to any text. Interpretive questions have two or more answers. Verb such as why, how, explain, compare, contrast, evaluate can signal an open-ended query. Have students test each question by finding two responses the text supports. Once they’ve identified two different responses, they can compose another question.

By posting questions on a whiteboard, students can choose those that work for their texts or link to a specific area such as theme or genre structure.

You can also ask students to develop queries that lead to self-evaluation and add to them or adjust them throughout the year.

Closing Thoughts

When you incorporate student-led literary conversations, you inspire students to read, talk, and write about texts they choose. Remember, a student-centered approach builds a community of learners who collaborate and support one another. The result? Students improve as readers, writers, communicators, and critical thinkers.

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Author, teacher, coach, and speaker Laura Robb has more than 40 years teaching experience in grades 4-8 and now works with school districts to train teachers. You can learn more about student-led conversations in her latest book, Read, Talk, Write: 35 Lessons That Teach Students to Analyze Fiction and Nonfiction. Her 25+ books also include Unlocking Complex Texts and Vocabulary Is Comprehension

 

https://www.middleweb.com/34980/hold-collaborative-chats-about-differentiated-books/

Read Alikes for Percy Jackson

Books Like Percy Jackson:
11 Super Series to Read Next

by Devon Corneal

Find info here: http://www.readbrightly.com/books-like-percy-jackson/

There’s a lot for young readers to love in Rick Riordan’s novels — wise-cracking kid protagonists with cool powers, modern life layered with ancient myths, seemingly impossible quests, and insurmountable odds — and kids burn through them faster than he can pen new ones. If you know a middle grade reader who has already finished the entire Percy Jackson and the Olympians series, tackled the Kane Chronicles, and caught up with the latest Magnus Chase book … never fear, we’re here to help! We’ve picked a few series featuring a new cast of characters that are sure to help tide over even the most dedicated of Percy Jackson fans.

  • Seven Wonders Series

    by Peter Lerangis

    This series is kid-tested and mother-approved. My son can’t put the first book in The Seven Wonders series down and I love that he’s begging to stay up late to read it again. This five-book series begins on Jack McKinley’s 13th birthday — when he discovers he only has a few months to live unless he can find the magic Loculi hidden in the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.

  • Mark of the Thief Trilogy

    by Jennifer Nielsen

    Nic was only sent down into the cave to search for gold from Julius Caesar’s treasure, but when he finds a magical amulet that belonged to the emperor, his days as a slave for the Roman Empire will soon be over. Or so he thinks. As the holder of the amulet, Nic suddenly possesses new magical powers, but whether he can control them is another matter entirely.

  • Will Wilder Series

    by Raymond Arroyo

    Twelve-year-olds get into a lot of trouble, but not many of them manage to unleash an ancient enemy determined to destroy their hometown. Although, when the name of your town is “Perilous Falls,” bad things are bound to happen. Thank goodness Will Wilder has his great-aunt Lucille to help him fix things. She may look sweet, but she’s deadly and happens to be the curator of a museum of supernatural artifacts. Demons and monsters, beware!

  • The Blackwell Pages Series

    by K.L. Armstrong and M. A. Marr

    If your favorite Rick Riordan character is Magnus Chase, and not Percy Jackson, this series may be for you. Set in South Dakota, the first book in this trilogy introduces readers to Matt Thorsen, a descendant of Thor and soon-to-be slayer of monsters and trolls. And just to keep things interesting, Ragnarök is coming and, unless Matt and his friends find Thor’s hammer and shield, this time it really will be the end of the world.

  • The Cronus Chronicles Trilogy

    by Anne Usru

    Charlotte Mielswetzski and her cousin Zee have to find out what’s making their friends sick, but things don’t go quite according to plan. First they end up in the Underworld and then discover that the world as we know it is filled with Nightmares, Pain, and Death. To make matters worse, Charlotte and Zee learn that it’s up to them to save everyone on Earth and in the Underworld. No biggie. Easy peasy.

  • Gods of Manhattan Series

    by Scott Mebus

    New York City is cool, but nothing special, right? That’s what Rory Hennessy thought until he discovers Mannahatta, a parallel city existing with Manhattan that’s filled with magic and mystery and ruled by the Gods of Manhattan, which, oddly enough, include Babe Ruth. When Rory is asked to right a great wrong, things become more dangerous than he ever imagined.

  • Theodosia Throckmorton Series

    by R.L. LeFevers

    Theodosia Throckmorton spends a lot of time at the Museum of Legends and Antiquities. It’s not always fun, especially since she’s the only one who can see the black magic and curses enveloping the museum’s collection. To protect her father, the museum’s curator, and the rest of the staff, Theodosia must call on ancient Egyptian magic to remove the evil forces around every corner.

  • Children of the Lamp Series

    by P.B. Kerr

    Twins John and Philippa Gaunt are descended from genies — well, djinn to be exact. Yes, they can grant wishes and make things disappear. But they don’t know how to control that power, until they meet their Uncle Nimrod. After that, things get really interesting.

  • Addison Cooke Series

    by Jonathan W. Stokes

    I kid you not, my son read this book in two days. It was the first book he deemed worthy of the devotion he showed to Percy Jackson and Rick Riordan’s multiple universes. So thank you, Addison Cooke and your Incan adventures, for reminding me that action, humor, and a sarcastic 12-year-old boy is all a parent needs to remind her son why he loves to read. Now we just have to wait for Addison Cooke and The Tomb of Khan to come out in September 2017!

  • Bartimaeus Trilogy

    by Jonathan Stroud

    Everyone knows that the sorcerer’s apprentice always gets in trouble, and Nathaniel is no different. To get revenge on a ruthless wizard, Nathaniel summons the powerful djinni Bartimaeus. But he soon learns he can’t control him and finds himself trapped in a circle of betrayal and murder.

  • Atlantis Saga Series

    by T. A. Barron

    We’ve covered Norse, Egyptian, Greek, and Roman mythology, touched on genies, and sought out Incan treasures — but let’s not forget about the Lost City of Atlantis. The first book in the Atlantis Saga series opens in Ellegandia, where a young boy named Promi and his friend Atlanta join together to save their home from the ravages of a war between the spirit and human worlds.

Poetry: Various Forms

FORM IT: HORIZONS POETRY PROMPT

Source: http://www.tweetspeakpoetry.com/2017/01/23/form-poetry-horizons-prompt/

BY HEATHER EURE

Form It is a prompt that focuses on exploring our topic through form poetry. This time, we’re going to “form” horizons.

Prompt Guidelines and Options

  1. Consider how you are feeling today, as you approach your topic. Are you sorrowful? Overflowing with joy or good humor? Maybe you’re in a snarky frame of mind. Or feeling perplexed. Perhaps you’re just in the mood to tell a story or express gratitude or awe. You could also consider the nature of the topic itself. Think on these things before you…
  2. Choose a form that either matches or purposely works against how you feel as you approach your topic, or that matches or purposely works against the nature of the topic itself. Options:

Acrostic (good for creating puzzles and mystery or dedications)

Ballad (excellent way to tell a story)

Catalog Poem (useful for building intensity, praise, or a sense of magic)

Ghazal (helpful for emphasizing “longing” or for exploring metaphysical questions)

Haiku (good for creating immediacy or focusing in on emotion)

Ode (excellent way to praise something or someone you love or admire)

Pantoum (useful for plumbing depressive or anxious themes)

Rondeau (helpful for giving form to extremes of either sadness or dark wit)

Sestina (good for exploring confusion, questions, worries, neuroses, fears in an oblique way)

Sonnet (excellent way to confine a bombastic theme or reign in a potentially sappy or overly-sentimental theme; also an excellent way to “work against” a topic humorously)

Villanelle (useful for themes that feel resistant to answers; also can be used to “work against” a topic, using mocking humor)*

  1. Be specific. Think nouns instead of adjectives.
  2. Consider doing a little research about the topic you are covering: its history, associated words, music, art, sculpture, architecture, fashion, science, and so on. Look for unusual details, so you can speak convincingly and intriguingly.

Digital Citizenship

Lesson Plans. Interactive Games.

Professional Development. Family Education.

Navigating cyberbullying, privacy, safety, and other digital dilemmas are a real challenge for schools. But technology also provides incredible opportunities for students to learn, connect, create, and collaborate in ways never before imagined.

Your school can build a positive school culture that supports the safe and responsible use of technology with Common Sense Education’s K-12 Digital Citizenship Curriculum. Students can build skills around critical thinking, ethical discussion, and decision making. And you and your school can join thousands of others across the globe by getting recognized for your efforts.

Our turnkey curriculum includes comprehensive resources for students, like lesson plans, student digital interactives, and assessments, as well as professional development for teachers and materials for family education.

 

https://www.commonsensemedia.org/educators/digital-citizenship