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TAKE YOUR POET TO WORK DAY: ON LOCATION

Leaning Tower of Pisa with Hughes Plath Heaney Frost Barrett Brown for Take Your Poet to Work Day

It’s Take Your Poet to Work Day!

It’s a great day to let Adrienne Rich take a few calls. Bring Rumi with you for some banter at the water cooler. Robert Frost would enjoy leading your staff meeting. And Emily Dickinson would be great at filing. We believe there is poetry in the workplace, and there’s definitely a place for poets at work. We have a great collection of poets for you to color, cut out and glue to a popsicle stick to join you on the job.

But over the past few years as we’ve celebrated Take Your Poet to Work Day, we’ve noticed a trend: many of our favorite poets just don’t want to go to work. Instead, like many of us often dream to do, they find their way to the beach, or to the coffee shop, or to the county fair instead.

So this year, we thought we’d get ahead of our poets and take them to some great destinations from around the world.

Lady Liberty with Adrienne Rich for Take Your Poet to Work Day
Adrienne Rich met Lady Liberty in New York City.
Hollywood with Sara Teasdale Pablo Neruda and Emily Dickinson for Take Your Poet to Work Day
I’d have never guessed that Emily Dickinson would ever say she was ready for her close-up, butPablo Neruda and Sara Teasdale talked her into a trip to Hollywood.
Statue of David with Wisława Szymborska and William Wordsworth for Take Your Poet to Work Day
Wisława Szymborska and William Wordsworth came up with a plan to make Michelangelo’s Statue of David safe for work.
Neptune with Walt Whitman for Take Your Poet to Work Day
Walt Whitman might not be the best tool for fighting sea serpents, but if you’re Neptune, I guess you can make do.
Emily Bronte in Copenhagen with mermaid
Emily Brontë and a mermaid shared a quiet moment in Copenhagen.
Ahkmatova Whitman Heaney Frost Angelou at Eiffel Tower
Anna Akhmatova,Maya Angelou, and  Robert Frost waited in line for Seamus Heaney and Walt Whitman to come down so they could have their turn on the Eiffel Tower.
Easter Island with Eliot Rumi and Angelou for Take Your Poet to Work Day
Maya AngelouT. S. Eliot, and Rumi enjoyed an afternoon of hide-n-seek at Easter Island.
Stonehenge with Rossetti Keats Eliot and Poe for Take Your Poet to Work Day
Eliot had so much fun at Easter Island he invited Edgar Allan Poe to Stonehenge. Poe brought along  John Keats and Christina Rossetti, who just wanted to read books all day.
Wright Longfellow Brown at Sydney Opera House
Judith Wright invited friends Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and Elizabeth Barrett Browning over for an evening at the Sydney Opera House.
Big-Ben-Kobayashi-Issa-and-Matsuo-Basho-for-Take-Your-Poet-to-Work-Day
Matsuo Basho and Kobayashi Issa went to London to give Big Ben a hand.
Dickinson Angelou Yates and Poe on Mount Rushmore for Take Your Poet to Work Day
And wouldn’t you know it, Emily Dickinson, Maya Angelou, Edgar Allan Poe and William Butler Yeats came over to my home state and made an appearance at Mount Rushmore.

So where are you and your poet going today? Whether you’re going to work, to the beach, or on vacation, take along your favorite poet. Tweet a photo to us at @tspoetry with the hashtag#poettowork, and we might feature you.

Take Your Poet to Work Day Coloring Book CoverWe can’t wait to see where you go!

Click to get your free coloring book featuring our full collection of ready-for-work poets and everything else you need to celebrate Take Your Poet to Work Day 

 

Photos used under a Creative Commons license and sourced via Flickr; modified to include embedded poets. Mount Rushmore by CamellaTWU, Statue of Liberty by Fr Lawrence Lew, O.P., Neptune by Wally Gobetz, Statue of David by Darren & Brad, Leaning Tower of Pisa by Neil Howard, Easter Island by Babak Fakhamsadeh, Stonehenge by vgm8383, Big Ben by André Zehetbauer, Hollywood by Neil Kremer, Eiffel Tower by Gilad Rom, Sydney Opera House byMotiqua, Copenhagen by Greenland Travel.

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I had my students make a “Poet on a Stick” last year–they loved the activity.  I think this year I will have them recite a poem of their choosing from the poet of their choice and/or have them create a play with the poets…still ruminating about the lesson plan…anyway…Enjoy the photos!

TAKE YOUR POET TO WORK DAY 2016

TAKE YOUR POET TO WORK DAY IS COMING: HERE’S OUR 2016 FREE COLORING BOOK!

In just a few short days, crayons, popsicle sticks and poets will come together to celebrate the best day of the year in workplaces around the world.

Take Your Poet to Work Day is next Wednesday, July 20. (It’s always celebrated on the third Wednesday in July.) For the past few years, we’ve marveled at all the ways poets can help you out at work, from counting money in the cash register drawer to serving up espresso in the coffee shop. We’ve even seen a few poets in the board room, on the construction site, and, yes, on the beach. (Because poets take vacations too.)

We’re excited to release our free Take Your Poet to Work Day Coloring Book, updated with our fresh new crop of 2016 poets, including William Wordsworth, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Seamus Heaney, and Emily Brontë, Judith Wright, and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.

So get out your scissors and glue, and join us for a day of fun and celebration with poets in the workplace. And be sure to tweet us photos of your poets at work to @tspoetry on Twitter, with the hashtag #poettowork, and maybe we’ll feature you.

Take Your Poet to Work Day is Coming: Here’s Our 2016 Free Coloring Book!

Take-Your-Poet-to-Work-Coloring-Book-2016

App Review: Pokemon Go

App Review: Pokemon Go, the very basics, safety issues, and Pokemon Go and libraries

This weekend my timeline flooded with posts about Pokemon Go. Then on Sunday afternoon, The Teen came home from a friend’s house declaring they had walked 3 miles trying to catch Pokemons. So I decided I needed to figure out what this Pokemon Go is because my teens are definitely in to it.

Pokemon Go is an app that you download to your mobile device. You then use it to go and “catch” Pokemons. You can use the Pokemons that you have caught to battle other players in places that are called “Gyms”.

Here’s how it works:

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After you create your character, you follow a map on your phone to try and find Pokemons.

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Once you are close enough to a Pokemon, you then try and catch them, hence the “Gotta Catch ‘Em All” slogan. When you are close, it then gives you a prompt and turns on your camera. You can take a picture with your Pokemon.

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You then use your finger and kind of fling the Pokeball to catch your Pokemon.

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Once you catch it, it is added to your Pokedex. It’s like a Rolodex of all your Pokemon. Yesterday I met a man my age walking around the neighborhood, he had 42 Pokemon in his Pokedex. I have 6.

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You can also apparently go to Poke Gyms and battle other players, though I have not done this. This man’s house is apparently a gym and people keep showing up at the middle of the night to do their gym battles and he kind of wishes that maybe they wouldn’t:This Guy’s House Was Turned Into A Gym On Pokémon.

Pokemon Go and Safety Issues

It’s also important to know that there are some inherent safety issues to consider in Pokemon Go, because you have to go places to catch Pokemon. For example, I had no problem with my kids walking around a certain defined radius of our local neighborhood to catch Pokemon, but not all kids will have this luxury because they live in unsafe neighborhoods. And there is also the issue that we live in a time where POC probably feel less safe walking around playing. The Mary Sue had this important post on the subject of race that you will want to read: Black Geek Writes About How His Experience of Pokémon GO Is Affected By Race. To highlight this point, on my neighborhood FB group this morning someone posted that there was a “dark skinned man” parked outside her house taking a picture and she thought he was casing the neighborhood, but many other people responded that he was just probably playing Pokemon Go. However, apparently, some robbers are in fact using Pokemon Go to target people:Robbers use Pokémon Go to target victims. So while Pokemon Go may be a lot of fun, not all players will have the same experience and it is important of us all to be mindful of that.

You’ll also want to remember not to catch Pokemon and drive, there have already been a couple of accidents related to Pokemon Go.

Pokemon Go and Libraries

Some libraries have discovered that they are Poke Stops (they help you level up and give you special stuff) or Gyms and are capitalizing on that. In addition, some libraries are hosting Pokemon Clubs for players to meet and share their tips and tricks.

Bethany (@bookrarian) on Twitter is doing some cool things with Pokemon Go at their library, including setting “lures”. See also:

How local attractions are using Pokemon Go to lure visitors.

How ‘Pokémon GO‘ Can Lure More Customers To Your Local Business

Is LureSquad The First Monetized ‘Pokémon GO‘ App For Businesses?

Pokémon Go is doing what few apps can – driving real-world traffic

Why Pokemon Go and The Library is a perfect partnership – ALSC Blog

You’ll definitely want to be aware of this game so that you can be ready to talk to the people who come into your library about it. And honestly, it’s fun. I think I will keep playing.

 

 

Source: http://www.teenlibrariantoolbox.com/2016/07/app-review-pokemon-go/

Cartographic Caricatures of European Countries

 

Source: https://www.brainpickings.org/2016/07/04/aleph-geographical-fun/

Scholastic 2016 reading bingo

Setting reading goals for yourself and the children in your world is a fun way to open a world of possible each year. The reading challenge that I tried in 2015 pushed me to read more adult books and genres that I don’t hit that often. This year, OOMers’ reading resolutions cover our reading habits, genres, and methods, as well as how some of us will track our progress using checklists, spreadsheets, or websites.

We are making the challenge of achieving your reading goals even more fun in 2016 by turning it into a game –the Scholastic 2016 Reading Bingo!

How to play:

  1. Download the PDF for the Scholastic 2016 Reading Bingo board.
  2. Read a book.
  3. See which descriptions/squares the book matches.
  4. Write the name of the book in the square or, for a fun visual, print out a small image of the book’s cover and paste it in the box.
  5. Repeat steps 2-4 several times.
  6. Once you fill in a row vertically, horizontally, or diagonally – yell “BINGO!” nice and loud.

If you really want to challenge yourself, read 49 unique books and complete the whole board!

I already got started with Matt de la Peña and Christian Robinson’s 2016 Newbery medal winning picture book Last Stop on Market Street in the center square and Laura Resau’s middle grade novel The Lightning Queen in the top row.

We’d love to follow your progress if you want to share your reading bingos on social media; just use the hashtag #ScholasticReadingBingo !

Challenge your students and library patrons to play!

Happy reading.

Source: http://oomscholasticblog.com/post/scholastic-2016-reading-bingo