Cyber Security – from the Today show

For discussion/projects etc.

Are Facebook and Instagram listening to you? Jeff Rossen investigates tech myths
3 hours agoJeff RossenJoe Enoch
TODAY

You’re looking to buy some new sunglasses when all of a sudden an advertisement for sunglasses pops up in your Instagram or Facebook feed.

It’s one of those eerie coincidences that make you wonder if Facebook or Instagram are listening to you through your phone or laptop.

TODAY national investigative correspondent Jeff Rossen teamed with cyber security expert Jim Stickley on TODAY Tuesday to see if that’s true, and take a look at three tech myths to find out what’s real, what’s not, and what kind of changes you can make to better protect your privacy.

Get Jeff Rossen’s new book “Rossen to the Rescue” here

Myth No. 1: Facebook and Instagram are listening to you through your phone or computer.

Answer: No. It just looks like a targeted ad because of all the information those apps gather about your habits.

“Facebook and Instagram, they’re able to build a profile on you based on what you do, so every time you click ‘like,’ every time you click on an ad, the apps you install, even the things not directly related to Facebook, still have partnerships oftentime with Facebook,” Stickley said.

Read the rest of the article here:

Advertisements

What Doesn’t Work: Literacy Practices We Should Abandon

JUNE 3, 2016

The number one concern that I hear from educators is lack of time, particularly lack of instructional time with students. It’s not surprising that we feel a press for time. Our expectations for students have increased dramatically, but our actual class time with students has not. Although we can’t entirely solve the time problem, we can mitigate it by carefully analyzing our use of class time, looking for what Beth Brinkerhoff and Alysia Roehrig (2014) call “time wasters.”

Consider the example of calendar time. In many U.S. early elementary classrooms, this practice eats up 15-20 minutes daily, often in a coveted early-morning slot when students are fresh and attentive. Some calendar time activities may be worthwhile. For example, teachers might use this time for important teaching around grouping and place value. But other activities are questionable at best. For example, is the following routine still effective if it’s already February and your students still don’t know:

Yesterday was _______.
Today is _______.
Tomorrow will be _______,

Does dressing a teddy bear for the weather each day make optimal use of instructional time? Some teachers respond, “But we love our teddy bear, and it only takes a few minutes!” But three minutes a day for 180 days adds up to nine hours. Children would also love engineering design projects, deep discussions of texts they’ve read, or math games.

5 Less-Than-Optimal Practices

To help us analyze and maximize use of instructional time, here are five common literacy practices in U.S. schools that research suggests are not optimal use of instructional time:

1. “Look Up the List” Vocabulary Instruction

Students are given a list of words to look up in the dictionary. They write the definition and perhaps a sentence that uses the word. What’s the problem?

We have long known that this practice doesn’t build vocabulary as well as techniques that actively engage students in discussing and relating new words to known words, for example through semantic mapping (Bos & Anders, 1990). As Charlene Cobb and Camille Blachowicz (2014) document, research has revealed so many effective techniques for teaching vocabulary that a big challenge now is deciding among them.

2. Giving Students Prizes for Reading

From March is Reading Month to year-long reading incentive programs, it’s common practice in the U.S. to give students prizes (such as stickers, bracelets, and fast food coupons) for reading. What’s the problem?

Unless these prizes are directly related to reading (e.g., books), this practice actually makes students less likely to choose reading as an activity in the future (Marinak & Gambrell, 2008). It actually undermines reading motivation. Opportunities to interact with peers around books, teacher “book blessings,” special places to read, and many other strategies are much more likely to foster long-term reading motivation (Marinak & Gambrell, 2016).

3. Weekly Spelling Tests

Generally, all students in a class receive a single list of words on Monday and are expected to study the words for a test on Friday. Distribution of the words, in-class study time, and the test itself use class time. What’s the problem?

You’ve all seen it — students who got the words right on Friday misspell those same words in their writing the following Monday! Research suggests that the whole-class weekly spelling test is much less effective than an approach in which different students have different sets of words depending on their stage of spelling development, and emphasis is placed on analyzing and using the words rather than taking a test on them (see Palmer & Invernizzi, 2015 for a review).

4. Unsupported Independent Reading

DEAR (Drop Everything and Read), SSR (Sustained Silent Reading), and similar approaches provide a block of time in which the teacher and students read books of their choice independently. Sounds like a great idea, right?

Studies have found that this doesn’t actually foster reading achievement. To make independent reading worthy of class time, it must include instruction and coaching from the teacher on text selection and reading strategies, feedback to students on their reading, and text discussion or other post-reading response activities (for example, Kamil, 2008; Reutzel, Fawson, & Smith, 2008; see Miller & Moss, 2013 for extensive guidance on supporting independent reading).

5. Taking Away Recess as Punishment

What is this doing on a list of literacy practices unworthy of instructional time? Well, taking away recess as a punishment likely reduces students’ ability to benefit from literacy instruction. How?

There is a considerable body of research linking physical activity to academic learning. For example, one action research study found that recess breaks before or after academic lessons led to students being more on task (Fagerstrom & Mahoney, 2006). Students with ADHD experience reduced symptoms when they engage in physical exercise (Pontifex et al., 2012) — ironic given that students with ADHD are probably among the most likely to have their recess taken away. There are alternatives to taking away recess that are much more effective and don’t run the risk of reducing students’ attention to important literacy instruction (Cassetta & Sawyer, 2013).

Measure of Success

Whether or not you engage in these specific activities, they provide a sense that there are opportunities to make better use of instructional time in U.S. schools. I encourage you to scrutinize your use of instructional time minute by minute. If a practice is used because we’ve always done it that way or because parents expect it, it’s especially worthy of a hard look. At the same time, if a practice consistently gets results in an efficient and engaging way, protect it at all costs. Together we can rid U.S. classrooms of what does notwork.

Notes

  • Bos, C.S. & Anders, P.L. (1990). “Effects of interactive vocabulary instruction on the vocabulary learning and reading comprehension of junior-high learning-disabled students.” Learning Disability Quarterly, 13, pp.31-42.
  • Brinkerhoff, E.H. & Roehrig, A.D. (2014). No more sharpening pencils during work time and other time wasters. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
  • Cassetta, G. & Sawyer, B. (2013). No more taking away recess and other problematic discipline practices. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
  • Cobb, C. & Blachowicz, C. (2014). No more “look up the list” vocabulary instruction. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
  • Fagerstrom, T. & Mahoney, K. (2006). “Give me a break! Can strategic recess scheduling increase on-task behaviour for first graders?” Ontario Action Researcher, 9(2).
  • Kamil, M.L. (2008). “How to get recreational reading to increase reading achievement.” In 57th Yearbook of the National Reading Conference, pp.31-40. Oak Creek, WI: National Reading Conference.
  • Marinak, B.A. & Gambrell, L. (2016). No more reading for junk: Best practices for motivating readers. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
  • Miller, D. & Moss, B. (2013). No more independent reading without support. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
  • Palmer, J.L. & Invernizzi, M. (2015). No more spelling and phonics worksheets. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
  • Pontifex, M.B., Saliba, B.J., Raine, L.B., Picchietti, D.L., & Hillman, C.H. (2012). “Exercise improves behavioral, neurocognitive, and scholastic performance in children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.” The Journal of Pediatrics, 162(3), pp.543-551.
  • Reutzel, D.R., Fawson, P., & Smith, J. (2008). “Reconsidering silent sustained reading: An exploratory study of scaffolded silent reading.”Journal of Educational Research, 102, pp.37–50.

Source: http://www.edutopia.org/blog/literacy-practices-we-should-abandon-nell-k-duke

11 Alternatives to “Round Robin” (and “Popcorn”) Reading

DECEMBER 1, 2014

Round Robin Reading (RRR) has been a classroom staple for over 200 years and an activity that over half of K-8 teachers report using in one of its many forms, such as Popcorn Reading. RRR’s popularity endures, despite overwhelming criticism that the practice is ineffective for its stated purpose: enhancing fluency, word decoding, and comprehension. Cecile Somme echoes that perspective in Popcorn Reading: The Need to Encourage Reflective Practice: “Popcorn reading is one of the sure-fire ways to get kids who are already hesitant about reading to really hate reading.”

Facts About Round Robin Reading

In RRR, students read orally from a common text, one child after another, while the rest of the class follows along in their copies of the text. Several spinoffs of the technique offer negligible advantages over RRR, if any. They simply differ in how the reading transition occurs:

  • Popcorn Reading: A student reads orally for a time, and then calls out “popcorn” before selecting another student in class to read.
  • Combat Reading: A kid nominates a classmate to read in the attempt to catch a peer off task, explains Gwynne Ash and Melanie Kuhn in their chapter of Fluency Instruction: Research-Based Best Practices.
  • Popsicle Stick Reading: Student names are written on Popsicle sticks and placed in a can. The learner whose name is drawn reads next.
  • Touch Go Reading: As described by Professor Cecile Somme, the instructor taps a child when it’s his or her turn to read.

Of the thirty-odd studies and articles I’ve consumed on the subject, only one graduate research paper claimed a benefit to RRR or its variations, stating tepidly that perhaps RRR isn’t as awful as everyone says. Katherine Hilden and Jennifer Jones’ criticism is unmitigated: “We know of no research evidence that supports the claim that RRR actually contributes to students becoming better readers, either in terms of their fluency or comprehension.” (PDF)

Why all the harshitude? Because Round Robin Reading . . .

  • Stigmatizes poor readers. Imagine the terror that English-language learners and struggling readers face when made to read in front of an entire class.
  • Weakens comprehension. Listening to a peer orally read too slowly, too fast, or too haltingly weakens learners’ comprehension — a problem exacerbated by turn-taking interruptions.
  • Sabotages fluency and pronunciation. Struggling readers model poor fluency skills and pronunciation. When instructors correct errors, fluency is further compromised.

To be clear, oral reading does improve fluency, comprehension and word recognition (though silent/independent reading should occur far more frequently as students advance into the later grades). Fortunately, other oral reading activities offer significant advantages over RRR and its cousins. As you’ll see in the list below, many of them share similar features.

11 Better Approaches

1. Choral Reading

The teacher and class read a passage aloud together, minimizing struggling readers’ public exposure. In a 2011 study of over a hundred sixth graders (PDF, 232KB), David Paige found that 16 minutes of whole-class choral reading per week enhanced decoding and fluency. In another version, every time the instructor omits a word during her oral reading, students say the word all together.

2. Partner Reading

Two-person student teams alternate reading aloud, switching each time there is a new paragraph. Or they can read each section at the same time.

3. PALS

The Peer-Assisted Learning Strategies (PALS) exercises pair strong and weak readers who take turns reading, re-reading, and retelling.

4. Silent Reading

For added scaffolding, frontload silent individual reading with vocabulary instruction, a plot overview, an anticipation guide, or KWL+ activity.

5. Teacher Read Aloud

This activity, says Julie Adams of Adams Educational Consulting, is “perhaps one of the most effective methods for improving student fluency and comprehension, as the teacher is the expert in reading the text and models how a skilled reader reads using appropriate pacing and prosody (inflection).” Playing an audiobook achieves similar results.

6. Echo Reading

Students “echo” back what the teacher reads, mimicking her pacing and inflections.

7. Shared Reading/Modeling

By reading aloud while students follow along in their own books, theinstructor models fluency, pausing occasionally to demonstrate comprehension strategies. (PDF, 551KB)

8. The Crazy Professor Reading Game

Chris Biffle’s Crazy Professor Reading Game video (start watching at 1:49) is more entertaining than home movies of Blue Ivy. To bring the text to life, students . . .

  • Read orally with hysterical enthusiasm
  • Reread with dramatic hand gestures
  • Partner up with a super-stoked question asker and answerer
  • Play “crazy professor” and “eager student” in a hyped-up overview of the text.

9. Buddy Reading

Kids practice orally reading a text in preparation for reading to an assigned buddy in an earlier grade.

10. Timed Repeat Readings

This activity can aid fluency, according to literacy professors Katherine Hilden and Jennifer Jones (PDF, 271KB). After an instructor reads (with expression) a short text selection appropriate to students’ reading level (90-95 percent accuracy), learners read the passage silently, then again loudly, quickly, and dynamically. Another kid graphs the times and errors so that children can track their growth.

11. FORI

With Fluency-Oriented Reading Instruction (FORI), primary students read the same section of a text many times over the course of a week (PDF, 54KB). Here are the steps:

  1. The teacher reads aloud while students follow along in their books.
  2. Students echo read.
  3. Students choral read.
  4. Students partner read.
  5. The text is taken home if more practice is required, and extension activities can be integrated during the week.

I hope that the activities described above — in addition to other well-regarded strategies, like reciprocal teaching, reader’s theater, and radio reading — can serve as simple replacements to Round Robin Reading in your classroom.

Tell us your favorite fluency or comprehension activity.

Source: http://www.edutopia.org/blog/alternatives-to-round-robin-reading-todd-finley

11 Hilarious Hoax Sites to Test Website Evaluation

TeachBytes

DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP / RESEARCH TOOLS

website_evaluation.8-10.custom_structured_siteIn this day and age, where anyone with access to the internet can create a website, it is critical that we as educators teach our students how to evaluate web content. There are some great resources available for educating students on this matter, such as Kathy Schrock’s Five W’s of Website Evaluation or the University of Southern Maine’s Checklist for Evaluating Websites.

Along with checklists and articles, you will also find wonderfully funny hoax websites, aimed at testing readers on their ability to evaluate websites. These hoax sites are a great way to bring humor and hands-on evaluation into your classroom, and test your students’ web resource evaluation IQ!

Check out these 11 example hoax sites for use in your own classrooms:

  1. All About Explorers
  2. Dihydrogen Monoxide Research Division
  3. California’s Velcro Crop Under Challenge
  4. Feline Reactions to Bearded Men
  5. Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus
  6. Aluminum Foil Deflector Beanie
  7. British Stick Insect Foundation
  8. The Jackalope Conspiracy
  9. Buy Dehydrated Water
  10. Republic of Molossia
  11. Dog Island

Of all of these, my favorite is always the Dihydrogen Monoxide website, which aims to ban dihydrogen monoxide and talks in detail about its dangers. Only after a few minutes did I catch that dihydrogen monoxide, is after all, H2O!

Happy hoax-hunting!

 

11 Hilarious Hoax Sites to Test Website Evaluation

YALSA Announces 2016 Great Graphic Novels for Teens List

http://www.diamondbookshelf.com/Home/1/1/20/823?articleID=173659

Full list here: http://www.ala.org/yalsa/2016-great-graphic-novels-teens

The American Library Association‘s (ALA’s) Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA) has announced its 2016 Great Graphic Novels for Teens list.

Designed to aid Young Adult librarians with graphic novel collections, the list presents graphic novels published in the past 16 months, selected for proven or potential appeal to the personal reading tastes of teens. Additionally, the Great Graphic Novels for Teens Committee has chosen a Top Ten list from the 112 titles which they feel “meet the criteria of both good quality literature and appealing reading for teens,” drawn from 170 official nominations.

The list encompasses a wide variety of genres and subjects, from offbeat superheroes, to mysterious villainous sidekicks, middle school drama, roller derby, and an examination of Hurricane Katrina’s aftermath. “We drew from a record number of nominations and ended up with a selection of quality graphic novels from all sorts of genres, perspectives, and cultures,” Great Graphic Novels for Teens Committee Chair Jason M. Poole was quoted as saying in the official press release.

Additionally, a number of graphic novels were included in YALSA’s Youth Media Awards and other reading lists, which can be found here.

Presented here is a spotlight on the YALSA Great Graphic Novels for Teens Top Ten titles, with the full list below:

Awkward

By: Svetlana Chmakova

Publisher: Yen Press

Format: Hardcover/Softcover, 6 x 9, 192 pages, Black and White, $24.00/$13.00

ISBN: HC: 978-0-31638-132-1/SC: 978-0-31638-130-7

Penelope – Peppi – Torres, a shy new transfer student, wants nothing more than to fit in and find a place among her fellow artistically inclined souls. The last thing she wants is to stand out. So when she bumps – literally – into quiet, geeky, friendly but friendless Jamie Thompson, and is teased as the “Nerder’s Girlfriend,” Peppi’s first embarrassed instinct is to push him away and run. Though she later feels guilty and wants desperately to apologize for the incident, Peppi always ends up chickening out. She has no reason to speak to him, anyway, until she ends up bumping – figuratively and continually – into Jamie again! Will these two opposites ever see eye-to-eye, let alone become friends?

Awkward also made YALSA’s 2016 Quick Picks for Reluctant Young Adult Readers list

Drowned City: Hurricane Katrina and New Orleans

By: Don Brown

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Format: Hardcover, 6.5 x 10.25, 96 pages, Full Color, $18.99

ISBN: 978-0-54415-777-4

On August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina’s monstrous winds and surging water overwhelmed the protective levees around low-lying New Orleans, Louisiana. Eighty percent of the city flooded, in some places under twenty feet of water. Property damages across the Gulf Coast topped $100 billion. One thousand eight hundred and thirty-three people lost their lives. The riveting tale of this historic storm and the drowning of an American city is one of selflessness, heroism, and courage—and also of incompetence, racism, and criminality.

Drowned City: Hurricane Katrina and New Orleans was also named a Robert F. Sibert Honor Book for “most distinguished informational book for children”

Lumberjanes Volume 1
Lumberjanes Volume 2

By: Noelle Stevenson, Grace Ellis, Brooke Allen

Publisher: BOOM! Studios

Format: Softcover, 7 x 10, 128 pages, Full Color, $14.99

ISBN: Volume 1: 978-1-60886-687-8; Volume 2: 978-1-60886-737-0

At Miss Qiunzella Thiskwin Penniquiqul Thistle Crumpet’s Camp for Hardcore Lady Types, things are not what they seem. Three-eyed foxes. Secret caves. Anagrams! Luckily, Jo, April, Mal, Molly, and Ripley are five rad, butt-kicking best pals determined to have an awesome summer together…and they’re not gonna let a magical quest or an array of supernatural critters get in their way!

Lumberjanes Volume 1 also made YALSA’a 2016 Popular Paperbacks for Young Adults and Quick Picks for Reluctant Young Adult Readers list

Preview of Lumberjanes Volume 1

Preview of Lumberjanes Volume 2

Ms. Marvel Volume 2: Generation Why
Ms. Marvel Volume 3: Crushed

By: G. Willow Wilson, Adrian Alphona, and Jake Wyatt

Publisher: Marvel Comics

Format: Softcover, 7 x 10.25, 136 pages, Full Color, $15.99

ISBN: Volume 2: 978-0-78519-022-6; Volume 3: 978-0-78519-227-5

Vol. 2: Who is the Inventor, and what does he want with the all-new Ms. Marvel and all her friends? Maybe Wolverine can help! If Kamala can stop fan-girling out about meeting her favorite super hero, that is. Then, Kamala crosses paths with Inhumanity – by meeting the royal dog, Lockjaw! But why is Lockjaw really with Kamala? As Ms. Marvel discovers more about her past, the Inventor continues to threaten her future. Kamala bands together with some unlikely heroes to stop the maniacal villain before he does real damage, but has she taken on more than she can handle? And how much longer can Ms. Marvel’s life take over Kamala Khan’s?

Vol. 3: Love is in the air in Jersey City as Valentine’s Day arrives! Kamala Khan may not be allowed to go to the school dance, but Ms. Marvel is! Well sort of – by crashing it in an attempt to capture Asgard’s most annoying trickster! Yup, it’s a special Valentine’s Day story featuring Marvel’s favorite charlatan, Loki! And when a mysterious stranger arrives in Jersey City, Ms. Marvel must deal with…a crush! Because this new kid is really, really cute. What are these feelings, Kamala Khan? Prepare for drama! Intrigue! Romance! Suspense! Punching things! All this and more!

Ms. Marvel Volume 3: Crushed also made YALSA’s 2016 Quick Picks for Reluctant Young Adult Readers list

Nimona

By: Noelle Stevenson

Publisher: Harper Teen

Format: Hardcover/Softcover, 6 x 9, 176 pages, Full Color, $17.99/$12.99

ISBN: HC: 978-0-06227-823-4/SC: 978-0-06227-822-7

The full-color graphic novel debut from Noelle Stevenson, based on her critically acclaimed web comic.

Nimona is an impulsive young shape-shifter with a knack for villainy. Lord Ballister Blackheart is a villain with a vendetta. As sidekick and supervillain, Nimona and Lord Blackheart are about to wreak some serious havoc. Their mission: prove to the kingdom that Sir Ambrosius Goldenloin and his buddies at the Institution of Law Enforcement and Heroics aren’t the heroes everyone thinks they are. But as small acts of mischief escalate into a vicious battle, Lord Blackheart realizes that Nimona’s powers are as murky and mysterious as her past. And her unpredictable wild side might be more dangerous than he is willing to admit.

Nimona also made YALSA’s 2016 Popular Paperbacks for Young Adults and Quick Picks for Reluctant Young Adult Readers lists

Roller Girl

By: Victoria Jamieson

Publisher: Dial Books for Young Readers

Format: Softcover, 6 x 9, 240 pages, Full Color, $12.99

ISBN: 978-0-80374-016-7

For most of her 12 years, Astrid has done everything with her best friend Nicole. But after Astrid falls in love with roller derby and signs up for derby camp, Nicole decides to go to dance camp instead. And so begins the most difficult summer of Astrid’s life as she struggles to keep up with the older girls at camp, hang on to the friend she feels slipping away, and cautiously embark on a new friendship. As the end of summer nears and her first roller derby bout (and middle school!) draws closer, Astrid realizes that maybe she is strong enough to handle the bout, a lost friendship, and middle school – in short, strong enough to be a roller girl.

Roller Girl also made YALSA’s 2016 Popular Paperbacks for Young Adults and Quick Picks for Reluctant Young Adult Readers lists

Sacred Heart
By:
 Liz Suburbia

Publisher: Fantagraphics Books

Format: Softover, 6.5 x 9.5, 336 pages, Black and White, $24.99

ISBN: 978-1-60699-841-0

This debut coming-of-age graphic novel, filled with teen loves and fights and parties, is a summer vacation-style bacchanalia set against the threat of a big reckoning that everyone believes is coming.

A Silent Voice Volume 1-3

By: Tow Ubukata and Yoshitoki Oima

Publisher: Kodansha Comics

Format: Softcover, 5 x 7, 192 pages, Black and White, $10.99

ISBN: Volume 1: 978-1-63236-056-4; Volume 2: 978-1-63236-057-1; Volume 3: 978-1-63236-058-8

A Silent Voice is a thought-provoking, dramatic story of a deaf student and the boy who bullies her. In elementary school, Shoya bullies the deaf Shoko mercilessly. When she transfers to another school to escape his torment, Shoya finds himself bullied by the students he once considered his friends. Years later, he learns sign language to apologize to Shoko for his behavior, and so begins a relationship that will change his and Shoko’s lives forever. Now Shoya struggles to redeem himself in Shoko’s eyes and to face the classmates who turned on him.

Trashed
By:
Derf Backderf

Publisher: Abrams ComicArts

Format: Hardcover/Softover, 6 x 9, 256 pages, Black and White, $24.95/$18.95

ISBN: HC: 978-1-41971-453-5/SC: 978-1-41971-454-2

Every week we pile our garbage on the curb and it disappears – like magic! The reality is anything but, of course. Derf Backderf’s Trashed is an ode to the crap job of all crap jobs – garbage collector. Trashedfollows the raucous escapades of three 20-something friends as they clean the streets of pile after pile of stinking garbage, while battling annoying small-town bureaucrats, bizarre townfolk, sweltering summer heat, and frigid winter storms. Trashed is inspired by Derf’s own experiences as a garbageinterspersed are nonfiction pages that detail what our garbage is and where it goes.

The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl Volume 1: Squirrel Power
The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl Volume 2: Squirrel You Know It’s True

By: Ryan North, Erica Henderson, and Steve Ditko

Publisher: Marvel Comics

Format: Softcover, Vol. 1: 128 pages; Vol. 2: 120 pages, Full Color, Vol. 1: $15.99; Vol. 2: $14.99

ISBN: Vol. 1: 978-0-78519-702-7; Vol. 2: 978-0-78519-703-4

Doctor Doom, Deadpool, even Thanos: There’s one hero who’s beaten them all – and now she’s starring in her own series! That’s right, it’s SQUIRREL GIRL! The nuttiest and most upbeat super hero in the world is starting college! And as if meeting her new roommate and getting to class on time isn’t hard enough, now she has to deal with Kraven the Hunter, too? At least her squirrel friend Tippy-Toe is on hand to help out. But what can one girl, and one squirrel, do when a hungry Galactus heads toward Earth? You’d be surprised! With time running out and Iron Man lending a helping hand (sort of), who will win in the battle between the Power Cosmic and the Power Chestnut?